Tools

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Joe Flynn & Quality Pawn will loan you top dollar on your nice quality tools or we will buy them outright. Whatever you want to do. Whether it’s Power Tools, a Generator, Paint Sprayers, Chain Saws, or a Jack Hammer we’ll take it.

We are interested in such brands as:

  • DeWalt
  • Rigid
  • Makita
  • Hitachi
  • Milwaukee
  • Snap-on
  • Matco
  • and much more.

We have the tools you need to get the job done! Why pay retail? Stop by today!

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We want to give you MORE money!!

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Top Tips for getting the most money when Pawning or Selling your items to us:
1. Make sure the item is clean and working
2. If the item came with any paperwork, certificates of authenticity manuals or an original box bring those with you as it will help us boost the price offered.
3. Bring along any Remote Controls, Cables, Cords, Chargers, Controllers and wires that may have came with the item
4. Make sure the devices are completely charged
5. For Jewelry, Coins, Watches or other luxury goods bring along any appraisals, certificates of authenticity or receipts you may have. While not necessary to sell these items, it does help boost the value if you do have them.
6. Make sure cords are not frayed and that all batteries and chargers are included
7. If the item is brand new and never opened please bring a receipt or proof of purchase
8. If the item requires fuel to work, please make sure there is a little bit in the tank to allow for the item to start and run for a few minutes.

Reinventing the Pawn Shop

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With buy-in from big venture capital firms and a friendly online interface, a new breed of personal asset lenders offer quick financing for the cash strapped.

When his family lost their Colorado farm in the late 1980s, a young Todd Hills went into town to pawn his saddle. “I got a lot less than the saddle was worth,” says Hills, “but I walked away with a job.” That’s right: He went to work for the pawn broker — and had soon worked his way up the company ladder. He later struck out on his own and eventually sold his own 30-store pawn operation to a publicly traded firm in 2007.

At that point, he stepped back and looked at the industry through a different lens. He saw two phenomena going on at the same time. One, the internet was developing into an ideal medium for scaling the traditional pawn model. And two, the financial crisis was creating a new kind of cash-crunched customer – middle- and upper-class folks, as well as  entrepreneurs, looking for a financing alternative. Continue reading